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Taken literally… the original Hippocratic Oath is pretty heady stuff, especially since the original Hippocratic Oath is a sacred oath… sworn to Apollo the Sun God. It's an oath where a new doctor swears to "never bring harm to anyone" lest he pay with his/her life. Seems modern medical "practice," (because practicing "IS" exactly what they're doing) IS an abomination of this sacred oath. Seriously, I would not want to be on the receiving end of the negative karmic field on this one. 





"The Hippocratic Oath is an oath historically taken by physicians and other healthcare professionals swearing to practice medicine honestly. It is widely believed to have been written by Hippocrates, often regarded as the father of western medicine. Of historic and traditional value, the oath is considered a rite of passage for practitioners of medicine in many countries, although the modernized version of the text has been bastardized over time. The Hippocratic Oath is one of the most widely known of Greek medical texts. It requires a new physician to swear upon a number of healing gods that he will uphold a number of professional ethical standards."

This is the Original English Translation:

"I swear by Apollo, the healer, AsclepiusHygieia, and Panacea, and I take to witness all the gods, all the goddesses, to keep according to my ability and my judgment, the following Oath and agreement:

To consider dear to me as my parents he who taught me this art; to live in common with him and if necessary to share my goods with him. To look upon his children as my own brothers, to teach them this art and that by my teaching I will impart a knowledge of this art to my own sons, and to my teacher's sons, and to disciples bound by an indentured oath according to medical laws, and no others.

I will prescribe regimens for the good of my patients according to my ability and my judgment "and never do harm to anyone."

I will give no deadly medicine to any one if asked, nor suggest any such counsel; and similarly I will not give a woman a pessary to cause an abortion.

But I will preserve the purity of my life and my arts.
I will not cut for stone, even for patients in whom the disease is manifest (surgery) for I will leave this operation to be performed by practitioners and specialists in this art.

In every house where I come I will enter only for the good of my patients, keeping myself far from all intentional ill-doing and all seduction and especially from the pleasures of love with women or men, be they free or slaves.

All that may come to my knowledge in the exercise of my profession or in daily commerce with men, which ought not to be spread, I will keep these secret and will never reveal.

And If I keep this oath faithfully, may I enjoy my life and practice my art, respected by all humanity and in all times; but if I violate it… "May the Reverse be my Life."

The oath has been modified multiple times. 

In the 1960s, the Hippocratic Oath was changed to "utmost respect for human life from its beginning", making it a more secular concept, not to be taken in the presence of God or any gods, but before only man.

While there is currently no legal obligation for medical students to swear an oath upon graduating, 98% of American medical students swear some form of oath. A 1989 survey of 126 US medical schools, only three reported usage of the original oath, while thirty-three used the Declaration of Geneva, sixty-seven used a modified Hippocratic Oath, four used the Oath of Maimonides, one used a covenant, eight used another oath, one used an unknown oath, and two did not use any kind of oath. Seven medical schools didn’t reply.
 


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    I've only been bloggin about a year now, my writings not that great but it's improving. Sometimes the content may seem preposterous… but we've awakened to the fact they're lying to us about med-sin. Logically your next question should be "what else are they lying about?" The truth is they're lying about "EVERYTHING." 

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